28/3/17

[identity profile] dreamville-bg.livejournal.com
I know, it's a constitutional right: if you still have citizenship of your country of origin, most constitutions say it shouldn't matter if you've lived abroad for decades. You have the right to vote.

For example, federal law gives US expats who no longer are residents of any state the right to vote in presidential, senate and house elections in the state in which they were last residents as if they were still residents there. But does this really make sense? For example, decades after leaving Connecticut, the expat living in Bangkok has the right to vote for congressman and senator from his old district and to vote for the Connecticut electors in the presidential race. I'm not seeing how this makes a lot of sense.

Most recently, there was a row in Canada (about a couple years ago) over Harper's (quite successful) efforts to disenfranchise Canadian expats from voting. More recently, British citizens also lost a legal battle in court over UK's ban of expats from voting on the EU referendum (political calculation?) On the other hand, now probably in a display of political calculation, the Tories are planning to lift a ban on 15 year expats from voting.

Some context... )

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